About

A moderate Singaporean Muslim blog.

Aka a healthy outlet for my random thoughts and armchair expertise in the discourse of my choice.

Aka forming fabulist fables and framing the familiar full-fledged fictive frustration in the facade of a frenetic friar, with a falsetto frequency of fulmination feasible in fashion – yet fathomably fecundate – to the factious fascism flinched by the fatigued yet familial famulus Faustian fanatic.

In essence, absurdity.

Why “Moderate”?

Purists hate the term. I do too, partially; Islam is complete, whole, and an encompassing religion. Those who practice what have been preached in the Qur’an and by the Prophet ﷺ, will find that there is no room for violence (read: radicalism).

Unfortunately, as with many other beliefs, Islam has been debated, diluted, and sieved into categories. While one may simply disregard these categorizations and deem them as trivial, the truth is that many people in the world see Islam with some label attached to it. And as labels go, they are condensed and usually plain misleading.

As the initiated may have read for the umpteenth time about the “radicals”, the term “moderates” have also been used repeatedly but with much neglect to its definition. Much attention has been given to the characterization of “radicals”, and most would conveniently assume that anything not falls under “moderates”.

Thus, those who pray five times a day are “moderates”. Those who don’t, are “moderates”. Those don’t drink are “moderates”. Those who do, are too. Confusing at best.

Then, there are those who try to use the term “moderates” and associate it with attempts to secularize the religion. They say, “Moderates are those who are Western-trained; so when you want a moderate opinion on religion, get them from those who study about Islam in the West.” Clearly isolating the traditionally-trained scholars, who, even by any standard, are “moderates”.

Some will say, “We are moderate Muslims. We believe in Allah. But the hadith, we don’t believe it. And we drink too.” Alienating those who believe in hadith as “radicals”, along with it those who don’t drink.

It’s a dirty, convoluted mesh of ideas and arguments.

Now, we see feminists who doesn’t conform to Islamic standards of humility and self-respect, calling themselves “moderates”. We see people who openly consume alcohol, regarding themselves as “moderates”. Those who don’t perform the daily prayers, rushing to be labeled as “moderates”. Even those who are picking and selecting parts of the Qur’an to justify everything from homosexuality to the latest fashion, in an ugly race to get a piece of the “moderate” label.

And for what? Funding? Recognition? Satisfaction?

In the end, the true followers of the teachings of Islam are drowned in the waves of media and loudhailers.

Like it or not, trivial labels are not so trivial anymore. The true followers of Islam are those who are compassionate and understanding. They are the same ones whose principles are not bargaining chips. They perform their work as well as they pray. They socialize and laugh without the need for liqour. They consume only what is good, and they abstain from what is haram. They aid and assist not expecting recourse. Their desires are fulfilled, for as long as it is halal.

The real moderates need to be heard and seen.

This is but an honest effort, albeit rudimentary and initial. Amidst daily routines, ill-timed deadlines, and sudden errands, insyaAllah there will be moments to fill in some void and blanks with mere words.

I pray this will be accepted as a good deed by the Almighty, so that I, a lowly and sinful servant, may hopefully, even amongst all His hard-working, pious, and devoted creations, somehow be included to receive so much as His forgiveness, protection and favor, by His Grace and Generosity.

؏

Avatar: “Jihad” | Credit: author unknown

  1. #1 by Zoya on 4 September 2009 - 1:57 pm

    Asalamoalaykum,

    Absolutely love your blog, MashAllah it’s a gem! I like the way you approach different issues and how balanced your articles are.

    May Allah reward you infinitely,Ameen.

    • #2 by writer01 on 14 December 2009 - 1:17 pm

      Ameen. Thank you for the kind words.

      Hope you benefited from it in some way. :)

  2. #3 by Elodie on 22 December 2009 - 9:10 pm

    Hello,

    Educational publisher, we are currently working on an english textbook, entitled “New projects 2nd”.
    We would like to license a picture we found on your blog to illustrate a chapter.
    Could you please send me an email if you are interested in and I will explain you with more details our request.
    thank you very for your help.
    Best regards,

  3. #4 by Juan Karin on 3 February 2010 - 5:10 am

    ur ideas are refreshing and present a clear line of thought, especially for a non-muslim like me.
    Keep up the gud work

  4. #5 by lyemoon. on 18 October 2010 - 6:04 pm

    Awesome entries :-D

    • #6 by Raphé P. Soto on 21 October 2010 - 10:17 am

      Thank you for the kind words. :)

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